Miyabi

Elegant, graceful, and refined – that’s how you should design your Japanese garden! Careful planning and watchful eyes are needed as you tend your garden. Only by skillfully placing stones, bushes, trees, ponds and pagodas on multiple levels can a player become the best garden designer of the season. Think you’ve got it figured out? Try one of the five included mini expansions!
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Players place plants, ponds, and pagodas in their gardens, always mindful of where they tread in the light of their lanterns.
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The gardens fill and grow in height over multiple building phases.
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It’s important to keep an eye on the other players and the bonus cards to help score the most points and win.

Exclusive: Game instructions for downloading

Exclusive: Game rulebook available for download

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Who can design the best garden? We’ll find out in the new family game for 2 to 4 players, Miyabi. Created by successful designer Michael Kiesling, this tile-placement game has players creating elegant and refined gardens through simple rules. The included five mini expansions promise long-lasting fun across future plays.

Author:

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Michael Kiesling has been inventing games for over 20 years. When not inventing new games, Michael is an engineering graduate who develops software in Bremen, Germany. He has received the coveted Spiel des Jahres award several times for his own designs, and in partnership with Wolfgang Kramer. In 2018, his game AZUL won the Spiel des Jahres award.

Illustrator:

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René Amthor, born in 1988 and living in Hilden Germany, was already doodling pages of comics in his school books as a boy. His passion for computer games ultimately led to him completing Game Design studies at the Mediadesign Hochschule in Düsseldorf. He initially gained work experience as an illustrator in game development companies and advertising agencies. At the end of 2015, he decided to go freelance and, together with his wife, founded the creative agency Studio Vieleck. His versatile illustration style means that he can work with many different media and target groups. He particularly enjoys illustrating for children.